5 Reasons Why You should Take Folic Acid In Pregnancy

5-Reasons-Why-You-should-Take-Folic-Acid-In-Pregnancy

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One in 1,000 babies is born with neural tube defects (NTDs) such as anencephaly and spina bifida (1). Research notes that the intake of folic acid supplements significantly lowered the risk of NTD affecting the pregnancy.

Folic acid or folate, which is referred to as the ‘pregnancy superhero’, should be consumed by women before and after they get pregnant. In this article, MomJunction tells you all about folic acid during pregnancy: how much you need, how to obtain it (sources) and when to avoid taking it.

What Is Folic Acid?

Folic acid is a synthetic form of vitamin B9 found in fortified foods and other supplements. It is usually utilized by the body to produce new cells and nucleic acid (which is a form of genetic material). It is essential for the healthy growth and development of the baby and helps in carrying out specific functions such as producing red blood cells, protecting the child’s ability to hear and supporting the baby’s organ development (2).

Experts recommend taking 400mcg of folic acid along with prenatal vitamins every day before and during pregnancy (3).

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Why Should You Take Folic Acid When Pregnant?

Here is why you need to increase your intake of folic acid if you are pregnant or are trying to get pregnant.

1. Prevents neural tube defects:

Folic acid helps in the neural development of the fetus. The neural tube of your fetus, which later grows into the brain and spinal cord of your baby, is protected by folic acid to prevent any prenatal defects during the early formation of the central nervous system (2).

2. Produces red blood cells:

Folate enhances the production of red blood cells in your body. This is vital during pregnancy when anemia (iron deficiency) is a common complaint. Folic acid ensures that the red blood cell (RBC) count in your body is normal even when you take other supplements that could replenish the iron (4).

3. Protects the baby from several complications:

Folic acid lowers the baby’s risk of cleft lip and palate. It also reduces the risk of premature birth, miscarriage, poor baby growth in your womb and low birth weight problems (2).

4. Protects expectant mom:

Adequate intake of folic acid everyday is known to prevent preeclampsia, heart stroke, heart disease, cancers and Alzheimer’s disease (5).

5. Other essential functions:

Folic acid is required for the production, repair, and functioning of DNA. It is also important for the quick growth of the placenta and developing baby (6).

Given its importance, folic acid needs to be taken even before you get pregnant.

[ Read: Vitamin C During Pregnancy ]

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When Should You Start Taking Folic Acid?

Your doctor will advise you to start taking folic acid when you plan to conceive. Considering that most birth defects could develop in the first trimester, consuming folate even before you conceive can be extremely helpful.

Consult your healthcare provider before picking your prenatal vitamins and make sure that it has the recommended amounts of folate you need.

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How Much Folic Acid Do You Need?

The standard breakup of recommended folic acid consumption before, after and during pregnancy is as follows (7):

  • Before conceiving: 400mcg
  • First trimester of pregnancy: 400mcg
  • Second and third trimesters of pregnancy: 600mcg
  • Breastfeeding stage: 500mcg

Consult your doctor to understand how much folic acid you have to consume, considering the other supplements you are taking and vitamin deficiencies if you have any.

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How Long Do You Need To Take Folic Acid During Pregnancy?

You can start taking folic acid at least three months before pregnancy and all through the pregnancy to lower the risk of birth defects (7).

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What Are The Effects Of Folic Acid Deficiency During Pregnancy?

Deficiency of folic acid will lead to pregnancy anemia with symptoms such as decreased appetite, pale skin, lack of energy, diarrhea, headache, and irritability (8). In the case of a moderate deficiency, you may not experience any symptoms but will lack the necessary amount of folate needed for baby’s embryonic development.

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Folic Acid Food Sources

Folate is found in several foods but is water-soluble and easily destroyed or eliminated when cooked. Therefore, the best way is to cook them just a little bit or eat raw if possible. Steaming or cooking by microwave is also good.

[ Read: Vitamin B Complex In Pregnancy ]

Here is a list of foods rich in folic acid. Folate per half cup of serving (9):

  • Cooked spinach: 131mcg
  • Fortified breakfast cereals: 100mcg
  • Black-eyed peas: 101mcg
  • Asparagus: 89mcg
  • White rice: 90mcg
  • Brussel sprouts: 78mcg
  • Spaghetti: 83mcg
  • Romaine lettuce: 64mcg
  • Avocado: 59mcg
  • Raw spinach: 58mcg

Some other good sources of folate are cabbage, green beans, mushrooms, sweet corn, zucchini, grapefruit, orange, legumes, juices, nuts, and eggs.

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When Should You Stop Taking Folic Acid?

You can stop taking folic acid once you reach 12 weeks of pregnancy since the baby’s spine will be well developed by then. However, you can continue taking folate post the 12th week, as it will not harm you or your baby in any way (10).

Keep reading for answers to more questions about folic acid intake during pregnancy.

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Frequently Asked Questions

1. Which folic acid tablets are good to take before or during pregnancy?

Some of the most commonly used folic acid supplements are from the brands such as Nature’s Blend, Now Foods and Nature’s Bounty.

2. How does folic acid help when you are trying to get pregnant?

Folic acid can improve your chances of becoming pregnant, as it boosts fertility and also improves RBC production besides providing other health benefits.

3. Are folic acid and prenatal vitamins the same?

Folic acid is already present in the prenatal vitamin formulas. If there is any need for extra folate, your doctor may prescribe additional folic acid supplements.

4. How much folic acid is required for the pregnancy of twins?

Women carrying twins need about 1,000mcg of folate per day (11).

5. Can folic acid intake during pregnancy cause diarrhea?

Folic acid deficiency can cause diarrhea. In such a case, make sure to have enough water to avoid dehydration and seek the doctor’s help to control diarrhea.

6. Can folic acid cause multiple pregnancies?

No, folic acid supplementation before pregnancy will not increase the likelihood of multiple pregnancies (12).

[ Read: Why Is Biotin Needed In Pregnancy ]

7. Is too much folic acid bad for pregnancy?

Yes, too much folic acid can increase your baby’s risk of developing autism, obesity, insulin resistance and cognitive impairment (13).

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Folic acid is essential to get pregnant and for the development of the fetus during pregnancy, but caution should be taken to avoid excessive intake of the vitamin. Also, as far as possible, try to obtain the vitamin from natural food sources and use supplements only if prescribed by the doctor. Talk to your obstetrician or nutritionist to devise an ideal diet plan to supplement your body with sufficient nutrients.

Have something to share about the use of folic acid when pregnant? Share with us in the comment section.

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Rebecca Malachi

She is a Biotechnologist with a proficiency in areas of genetics, immunology, microbiology, bio-engineering, chemical engineering, medicine, pharmaceuticals to name a few. Her expertise in these fields has greatly assisted her in writing medical and life science articles. With 8+ years of work experience in writing for health and wellness, she is now a full-time contributor for Momjunction.com. She is passionate about giving research-based information to readers in need. Apart from writing, she is a foodie, loves travel, fond of gospel music and enjoys observing nature in silence. Know more about her at: linkedin.com/in/kothapalli-rebecca-35881628
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