How To Teach Problem Solving To Kids?

How To Teach Problem Solving To Kids?

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IN THIS ARTICLE

As children grow, they get ample opportunities to learn about the world around them. And in the process, they encounter problems. Children of all ages face challenges on a daily basis – it can be peer pressure, a tricky math equation, or a toy-related conflict.

Often, you will not be around 24/7 to help them come up with solutions. Thus, you should help them improve their problem-solving skills so that they can handle different situations effectively. This way, when they encounter a problem, they will have the confidence to use their problem-solving skills and come up with creative solutions independently.

Read on as we tell you the importance of problem-solving skills for kids and list a few activities to help inculcate this vital skill in children.

Importance Of Problem-Solving Skills For Kids

Problem-solving benefits children in numerous ways. It helps them

  • Cope with challenges in everyday life.
  • Make effective decisions.
  • Pick up other skills, such as cooperation, critical thinking, and collaboration along the way.
  • Resolve problems without breaking them down.
  • Think outside the box.
  • Become more independent.

How To Inculcate Problem-Solving Skills In Children

Here are a few ways to encourage your child to utilize their problem-solving skills.

1. Test it out

Whenever your child encounters a problem, ask them to acknowledge it and embrace the challenge. If the outcome is not effective, they can try out different approaches. This will encourage your child to look at a problem from different angles.

2. Ask for advice

Sometimes, you may struggle to make decisions in your everyday life. For instance, you might struggle to decide what to cook for dinner or what to wear to the movies. Ask your children to help you make these simple decisions. When you ask them for their advice, it teaches them that they’re not the only ones who face problems. When you value their ideas, it will give them the confidence to solve problems independently.

3. Take a deep breath

One of the first steps to effective problem solving is remaining calm. Even with youngsters, when their emotions go out of hand, it’s difficult to look at things rationally, and the tendency to make impulsive decisions becomes higher. It’s important to teach your child to take deep breaths every time they feel they’re losing control of their emotions. Once they’re calm, they can assess the situation better.

4. Verbalize the problem

It would help your child if they verbally express how they feel and what they’re struggling with after calming down. It helps them gain perspective and makes it easier for them to come up with potential solutions.

5. Don’t provide “the answer”

While it’s difficult to watch your children struggle with an issue, do not give them the answer outright. Instead, give them hints to help them solve the problem independently. This way, they can learn to come up with creative solutions independently.

6. Lead by example

Children are like sponges and pick up things very quickly. So, when you confront a problem and come up with an effective solution, they’ll notice how you address issues and try to emulate you.

7. Allow natural consequences to unfold

Sometimes, letting the problem run its course is the best way to deal with it. So, when your child is faced with a problem, let them be. Let’s suppose your child spent all their weekly allowance in a day or two; let them go the entire week without allowance. This will set them up to make better choices in the future.

15 Problem-Solving Activities For Kids

There’s no better way to learn than through play. The following activities are quite fun and require children to display their problem-solving skills.

1. Puzzles

Puzzles

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One of the best problem-solving activities for children is puzzles. They come in various difficulty levels. Based on your child’s age, you can pick the appropriate one. Give them a puzzle, and they will learn to analyze the problem/question, find different ways of solving it, and arrive at the solution.

Additionally, the activity will help improve their critical-thinking skills, gross motor skills, and hand-eye coordination.

2. Scavenger hunt

Scavenger hunt

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One of the educational activities that every parent should introduce to their children is scavenger hunt. It is an inexpensive, easy, fun activity that can be done both indoors and outdoors and requires nothing more than the items you already have at home. The activity allows children to think outside the box. Without being aware, they’re learning problem-solving skills in a fun way.

3. Storybooks

Storybooks

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Reading offers a plethora of benefits. One of them is problem-solving. When children read stories, they come across various characters and the roles they play. Most often, children get attached to these characters. So, when they come across a problem, ask them how their favorite character would have solved it. Encourage them to come up with a variety of solutions and discuss the possible outcomes of each.

4. Crafts

Crafts

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Engaging them in arts and crafts is another excellent way to teach children problem-solving skills. Give your child a variety of materials lying around the house. Let them come up with all sorts of exciting creations or repair broken toys or gadgets. Allow them to work independently, and guide them only when they are out of ideas.

5. Open-ended questions

Open-ended questions

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Asking open-ended questions is an excellent way to improve your child’s ability to think creatively and critically and improve their problem-solving skills. With these questions, there’s no right or wrong answer, and the answer goes beyond a simple ‘no’ or ‘yes.’ They have to put some thought into their answers. Here are a few questions you can ask after each session.

  • What was difficult? What was easy?
  • What did you learn?
  • What do you think will happen next?
  • How did you arrive at the solution?
  • What would you do differently the next time?

6. Maze

Maze

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Mazes are fun and safe for all age groups. When they work on mazes, it makes them think. The activity also improves their motor skills, observational skills, sense of direction, and problem-solving skills. Think beyond book mazes – you can find many maze games on the web. With practice, they’ll get better at finding their way out. Eventually, you can give them more complex mazes to solve.

7. Mini treasure hunt

Mini treasure hunt

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Treasure hunt is one game that can get the entire family involved. You can keep their minds at work, especially if they know they’re going to win something in the end. Give them clues that encourage them to think outside the box and use their problem-solving skills to find the treasure in the end. Here are a few hints you could use to let them find the treasure:

  • My job is to put an end to your sleep. I do so with a beep, buzz, or music. (Ans: alarm clock)
  • I don’t have a face or arms, but I have hands that move at a steady pace. (Ans: Clock)
  • I’m filled with soft feathers, and it’s quite impossible for you to sleep without me. (Ans: Pillow/blanket)
  • Use me to clean your car in a jiffy or to give plants a drink. (Ans: Water hose)

8. Building with toys

Building with toys

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Give your children LEGO blocks, wooden blocks, engineering blocks, etc., and make them build whatever they wish. Building with toys requires your child to think about what to build and how to put the pieces together and come up with creative solutions to ensure it’s a functional design. You can once in a way ask them to build something challenging, such as a creature with three arms or two towers with a joining bridge. Watch them rack their brains as they try to come up with a structure.

9. Wool web

Give the children a multi-colored yarn and ask them to stand in a circle. One person loops the ball of yarn across a finger and passes it to another person. Once every person gets a chance to hold the ball and loop the yarn across their finger, a web would be created.

Now, blindfold one member and ask them to follow the verbal instructions of the others to unwind the web. This group activity involves teamwork, focus, patience, coordination, concentration, and problem-solving skills to figure a way out.

10. The human knot

It is a simple game that’s extremely fun. In this game, you need a group of children. Make the children form a circle and raise their hands. Start with one player, who has to use their right hand to hold onto a player’s hand from across the circle and their left hand onto someone else’s hand. Check if everyone has held both hands with different players. Now, without breaking the circle, they must untangle themselves. The challenge is complete once everyone’s hands are free and they are back in the circle.

11. Impromptu skits

Divide the players into teams. Write down different scenarios, such as dealing with bullying in school or resolving a fight between siblings, on pieces of paper, fold them, and place them in a bowl. Each team/player picks a chit and acts out the scenario. You can give them a time limit to prepare. Such impromptu activities help children identify a problem, formulate a solution, and execute it.

12. Group drawing

Another excellent team-building activity for sharpening children’s problem-solving skills is group drawing. Divide children into teams of three. Each of the three players in the team has a role to play.

One person is the drawer, who takes directions from the instructor to attempt to create a design. They should stand with their back to the instructor and viewer and must not talk.

Next is the instructor. The instructor is the one who gives out verbal instructions as to how the drawer must draw a particular design.

The viewer looks at the design. But, they’re not allowed to talk and can only communicate with the instructor via gestures.

You have a winner when the viewer is satisfied with the drawer’s picture. You can let the children take turns playing different roles.

13. Clue me in

Clue me in is a fun detective game that encourages cognitive development, critical thinking, and problem-solving. Start by selecting five to six target answers, such as a public figure, animal, historical event, social trend, or profession. Now, collect five to ten items associated with each target answer. They can be pictures from the Internet too. Place them in different bags.

Now decide how many clues a child can pick before making a guess. If it’s two, let the child pick up two clues from a bag and make their first guess. See who’s able to answer the quickest.

14. Survivor scenarios

Here’s another game that doesn’t require any items. In this game, you have to create pretend-play scenarios for children, and they have to analyze and think out of the box to solve. For instance, give them this scenario, “You’re stuck on an island, and you know help will not come for two days. How will you create a shelter for yourself with items around you?” This encourages them to think about different scenarios and find solutions to get out of the situation.

15. Moral dilemma

Children often find themselves in a dilemma. This simple game, without their knowledge, will help them cope with such scenarios. On pieces of paper, write down different dilemmas, such as ‘The cashier gave me $1 extra in change; what should I do?’ or ‘I saw my friend bullying someone at school. Should I stop them or let them be?’ Then fold it up and place it in a bowl. Get each child to pick one piece of paper, read it aloud, and come up with creative solutions on the spot to handle the situation.

Learning through play is one of the best ways to improve children’s problem-solving skills. You’ll see how it makes a world of difference in how your child thinks, talks, acts, and follows through with actions. If you have the time, you can play with them too – it’s an excellent way to bond and create lifelong memories.

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