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11 Safe Kegel (Pelvic Floor) Exercises After Delivery (With Pictures)

Kegel Exercises After Birth

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Kegel exercises can help you know if the pelvic floor muscles are relaxed or tensed, strengthen them, and reduce the discomfort after delivery (1) (2).

If you are planning to take up kegel exercises after childbirth, begin with identifying the pelvic floor muscles. These muscles are located around your vagina, anus, and urethra, and support your uterus and bladder. In short, the muscles that are tightened when you hold back your urine are the pelvic floor muscles.

In this post, MomJunction tells you when you can begin doing kegel exercises after delivery, how they can be useful to you and exercises that you may try.

When Is The Right Time To Start Kegel Exercises After Delivery?

The right time to start kegel exercises depends on the type of delivery (vaginal or cesarean) you had and how active you were during pregnancy. In the case of uncomplicated vaginal birth, you may start simple and effortless kegel exercises a few days after giving birth. But in the case of vaginal delivery with episiotomy, you might have to wait for a few weeks.

If you have had a c-section, it takes four to six weeks for the incision to heal, after which you should be able to start the exercises (3) (4). In any case, you should talk to your doctor before starting the exercise as every pregnancy is different.

How Kegel Exercises Might Help After Delivery

Besides strengthening pelvic floor muscles, regular kegel exercises can help in the following ways.

  1. Urine incontinence: Strengthening the pelvic floor muscles by performing kegel exercises can help reduce urine leakage (5).
  1. Pelvic floor prolapse: When the pelvic muscles get weak after delivery, they could drop down and push against vagina walls. But doing kegel exercises regularly after childbirth might help you prevent this (6).
  1. Postnatal healing: Sometimes, an episiotomy is done during labor to facilitate childbirth. Post the procedure, the body needs time and proper care to heal. Postnatal kegel exercises help in reducing perineal pain (7).

Next, we give you a list of kegel exercises you can try during the weeks after childbirth.

11 Postpartum Kegel Exercises You May Try After Childbirth

Before you start these kegel exercises, talk to your doctor about them, and find out if it is okay for you to do them.

After six weeks

Here are a few simple kegels you can try in or around the sixth week after delivery.

1. Hold and release

You may try this simple and basic exercise thrice a day (5).

Hold and release

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How to:

  • You can sit on the floor or a chair
  • Breathe in and breathe out throughout the exercise
  • To hold or squeeze the pelvic floor muscles, pretend that you are to hold the urine
  • Hold for a few seconds or count to three
  • Then release slowly and count to three
  • Repeat the same about ten to 15 times

2. Standing kegel activation

This is a variation of the first exercise and involves breathing and contractions.

Standing kegel activation

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How to:

  • Stand straight, and do not bend
  • Inhale and exhale to start the exercise
  • Hold the pelvic floor muscles for a few seconds, while breathing normally
  • Release the contraction for a few seconds
  • Breathing and contractions should be in sync
  • Repeat it for about ten times

3. Heel slides

This exercise can be used to restore functional strength (8).

Heel slides

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How to:

  • Lie down on the floor with your knees bent
  • Start with slow breathing exercises
  • Slide the right leg out, parallel to the ground and then bring it back to the starting position
  • Repeat the same with your left leg
  • Start with five sets and gradually increase it to ten a day

4. Slow and quick contractions

These simple exercises help strengthen your pelvic floor muscles. You may do them anytime, either while reading or watching TV (9).

Slow and quick contractions

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How to:

Slow contractions

  • Hold your pelvic floor contraction for about ten sections
  • And then release slowly for ten sections
  • You can do it for less than ten seconds too if that is what is comfortable to start with
  • Practice it regularly and gradually build up to holding the contractions for ten seconds

Fast contractions

  • Hold the contraction for one second, and release and relax the next
  • Initially, doing it one or two times is good enough
  • You may gradually increase it to ten times

After eight weeks

5. Pelvic tilt

This exercise helps in strengthening and toning the abdominal muscles and also alleviates backache (1).

Pelvic tilt

Image: Shutterstock

How to:

  • Lie down on your back and bend your knees
  • Tighten the buttock and abdominal muscles for tilting the pelvis. Make sure you are not arching your back
  • Hold to the count of three, and slowly bring it down
  • Repeat this five times a day

6. Pelvic bridge

It is good for both strengthening the pelvic and abdominal muscles (10) (11). You may ask your doctor about this exercise and the right time to do it post-delivery. In case you find it difficult or feel uncomfortable during or after the exercise, do not continue.

Pelvic bridge

Image: Shutterstock

How to:

  • Lie down on the back and bend your knees
  • Slowly lift your tummy or push the pelvis up, keeping your hands on the sides
  • Hold the position for five to ten seconds (hip muscles and glutes should be tightened)
  • And come down in the starting position while relaxing the muscles
  • Relax for a while and repeat the routine six to eight times. Once it gets easy and you get comfortable with it, increase the number of repetitions

7. Pelvic leg fall out

This exercise is also called a bent knee fall out, or single-leg fall out. It is good for the abdomen and the groin (12).

Pelvic leg fall out

Image: Shutterstock

How to:

  • Lie down on the back and fold your knees
  • Breathe in and breathe out
  • When breathing out, hold the pelvic floor muscles and let your right leg fall to the side
  • Release the contraction and bring the leg back to the start position
  • Repeat the same with left leg
  • Do the exercise for about ten times

After 12 weeks

Now that you are used to the above pelvic or kegel exercises, you can increase the number of sets for each. Or, you can try some advanced pelvic exercises, but after checking with the doctor first.

8. Pelvic rocks

This exercise is good for your pelvic muscles and your back.

Pelvic rocks

Image: Shutterstock

How to:

  • Come down on all your fours (hands and knees)
  • Inhale and tuck your head downwards. Push your back up to form a curve and hold it there for a few seconds
  • Exhale and look upwards while lowering the back, and hold the position for a few seconds
  • Repeat the same for five to eight times

9. Mini kegel squats

Three months after the delivery, your body is ready to perform other workouts too. Squatting and mini squats holding your baby are among the recommended exercises to help your back, pelvic floor muscles, and even abdomen area (13).

Mini kegel squats

Image: Shutterstock

How to:

  • Once you are comfortable with sitting, standing, and focusing on the right posture, you may start the mini squats
  • Stand on the ground with your feet wide apart
  • Gently lower down by pushing your hips
  • Your knee should be in alignment with your feet, and your shoulders should be straight
  • Once you are comfortable with mini squats, you can try squats and deep squats

10. Kegel heel raises

This exercise strengthens the lower part of your body and helps you balance better.

Kegel heel raises

Image: Shutterstock

How to:

  • Stand on the floor, keep your back and shoulders straight
  • Breathing in and out should be constant
  • Slowly lift your heels; you can put your hands up or take the support of a wall or chair if needed
  • Hold for a few seconds and come to the start position
  • Kegel contractions should be done throughout the exercise
  • You can start with four or five, and then increase the repetitions as you get comfortable.

11. Plank

Some people recommend doing the plank exercise postpartum. However, a few also suggest avoiding them. There is no proper evidence to support the claims. You may ask your healthcare professional to advise you based on your condition post-delivery.

Plank

Image: Shutterstock

How to:

  • Lie down face forward on the floor, but with only your toes and elbows touching the floor
  • Your back should be stiff and straight
  • Hold the posture to a count of eight or ten, and release
  • Repeat it two or three times

Regular kegel exercises can be beneficial for your overall health, and also give you a chance to get back to your pre-pregnancy shape.

Tips For Doing Kegel Exercises

It is easy to do kegel exercises after delivery, provided you do them right. Start slow and remember these tips to get it right.

  1. To get started, identify your pelvic floor muscles by pretending to hold your urine.
  1. Be focused, don’t hold or bend the muscles in the buttocks, thighs, or abdomen.
  1. Keep inhaling and exhaling while performing kegel exercises and ensure that you do not hold the breath.
  1. Initially, you may start with one or two kegel exercises and do it twice or thrice a day. And once you get comfortable, you may try different kegels and also increase the number of repetitions.
  1. Whether you are sitting, standing, or lying down during the pelvic floor exercises, your posture has to be straight.
  1. Make these exercises a part of your routine for long-term benefits.

Kegel exercises are easy. You can perform the kegels without any equipment, right in the comfort of your home. All you need to do is spend a few minutes of your day to learn the right way to do the kegels to tone and strengthen your pelvic floor muscles. If you have doubts about a kegel exercise, consult your doctor. Stop the exercise routine should you face any discomfort or pain.

Do you perform any postpartum kegel exercises? Feel free to tell us about them in the comment section below.

References:

1. Postpartum Exercises; Sutter Health
2. Kegel exercise; Allina Health (2002)
3. New Moms Benefit From Balanced Nutrition; Torrence Memorial (2017)
4. Mommies in Motion; Perinatal Web
5. Kegel exercises; Beth Israel Lahey Health Winchester Hospital
6. The pelvic floor; the women’s
7. R. E. Farrag, A. S. Eswi, and H. Badran; Effect Of Postnatal Exercises on Episiotomy Pain and Wound Healing Among Primiparous Women; IOSR Journal of Nursing and Health Science (2016)
8. N. Nichols; Restore Your Core: Progressive Exercises for Post-Pregnancy; American Fitness
9. Your recovery after childbirth; Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust
10. Postpartum Wellness; Woman’s
11. A. Cabotaje; What You Should Know About Exercising After Having a Baby; UW Medicine (2019)
12. Postpartum Fitness Getting Back In Shape After Your Pregnancy; Kaiser Permanente
13. Body after birth: Treating post-pregnancy problems; UT Southwestern MedicalCenter (2016)

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