Thrush In Children: Symptoms, Causes And Treatment

Thrush In Children

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Does your child complain of painful sores in the mouth? Do they have difficulty in swallowing food? It is probably because of thrush, one of the common fungal infections to affect children. Thrush in children is not a cause of concern if the child is otherwise healthy. While there is nothing to worry about, it is good to know how to manage it to keep the child comfortable.

In this post, MomJunction explains the signs and symptoms of thrush, its causes, diagnosis, treatment, and preventive measures to follow.

What is Thrush?

Thrush is a fungal infection of the mouth and is caused by the yeast Candida albicans (1). It can affect the tongue, throat, gums, or the lining of the mouth, causing irritation. Thrush is also called oral candidiasis or oral thrush.

The yeast Candida is a microorganism naturally present inside the body. It grows at a normal rate in the mouth, throat, or esophagus without causing any symptoms. But if the environment inside the mouth becomes favorable for excessive growth of this microorganism, it can lead to an infection (2).

The next section lists the signs of thrush you must look for in your child.

What Are The Symptoms Of Thrush?

If your child complains of discomfort or pain in the mouth, then check for these symptoms (3, 2):

  • White spots or patches on the lips, tongue, and the inner cheek.
  • Scraping the white patch reveals the red spots which may bleed.
  • Soreness of mouth and throat.
  • Cracks and fissures in the mouth.
  • Difficulty in swallowing food.
  • Loss of taste.
  • Feels like there is cotton in the mouth.

The section below lists the risk factors causing thrush in children.

What Are The Causes Of Thrush?

Here are the factors that can increase the chances of thrush in children (3):

  • Result of an antibiotic treatment that destroys the balance of microorganisms within the body.
  • Weakened immune system due to prolonged illness or health conditions like HIV, cancer or cancer treatments, or congenital immune deficiencies.
  • Conditions causing dry mouth.
  • Use of medications for treating psychiatric conditions.
  • Use of corticosteroids for the treatment of inflammation or asthma can cause oral thrush.

Early diagnosis of the condition helps in taking the right step towards treatment.

How Is Thrush Diagnosed?

The pediatrician will first examine the child for the symptoms of thrush. Further, a small sample will be collected by scraping the lesion inside the mouth for microscopic examination. It helps to identify the type of yeast and its sensitivity.

The below section explains the different medications used in treating thrush.

What Is the Treatment For Thrush?

Mild thrush generally does not require any treatment as it clears on its own. But if the symptoms do not subside, then the doctor may prescribe the following treatments:

  1. Antifungal oral gel: The doctor may prescribe an anti-fungal oral gel that needs to be applied to the affected area in the mouth, using a cotton swab. It needs to be done at least four times a day. Make sure not to feed the child for 30 minutes after applying the medicine. The medicine has to be used for seven days and continued for three more days after the thrush disappears (4).

Dosage: 1mL for one-month-old babies and 2mL for children aged over a month

  1. The doctor may also prescribe an anti-fungal drop that needs to be given to the child after every meal for up to 10 days (5).
  1. Nystatin (Antifungal mouthwash) is commonly prescribed for thrush in children. Other medicines include clotrimazole (Lozenges), fluconazole (Diflucan), and itraconazole (Sporanox). The last two are available as pills or syrups. (6).

If you find any unusual symptoms along with thrush, then call your doctor right away.

When To Call A Doctor?

When thrush becomes severe, the child may show other symptoms too. Watch out for these symptoms and seek medical assistance if your child has them (5,4):

  • The child looks unwell and has a fever.
  • Extremely dry mouth.
  • Painful lesions develop inside the mouth.
  • The infection becomes recurrent even after taking the medication.
  • Dark urine or very less urination in 8 hours.
  • Drinking less water.
  • Bleeding in the mouth.

Mild thrush can be managed with a few home remedies.

Home Remedies For Treating Thrush

Here are a few home care tips to prevent thrush and alleviate its symptoms in children:

  • Use a soft toothbrush for brushing the teeth.
  • Use warm salt water to rinse the mouth.
  • Let the child eat unsweetened yogurt while taking medicines for thrush.
  • Lactobacillus supplements help maintain the balance of Candida in the mouth.
  • Eating cold food and drinking cold liquids can ease the discomfort of thrush. Also, eating soft and easy-to-swallow food can lessen the discomfort of thrush.

Thrush is usually curable. But in the case of a weakened immune system, there are chances of re-occurrence, which may cause serious problems (6).

Complication Of Oral Thrush

Oral thrush is rarely dangerous but can be unpleasant. If the fungus spreads into the food pipe, then it makes swallowing difficult. Severe untreated thrush can also spread to the esophagus, urinary tract, or the whole body causing an infection that can lead to multiple organ failure and death (3).

However, if it is left untreated for years, then the fungus can penetrate, although rarely, deeper into the tissue layers and enter the bloodstream, resulting in blood poisoning (septicemia), which is also life-threatening (1).

Preventive measures can stop the overgrowth of the fungus that leads to such complications. Find out more about it in the next section.

How To Prevent Oral Thrush?

Here are a few tips you can follow to prevent thrush:

  • Avoid using mouthwash.
  • Maintaining proper oral hygiene.
  • Rinsing the mouth thoroughly after the child uses a corticosteroid inhaler.

When detected early, thrush can be easily controlled with the right medication. Do not neglect thrush, no matter how trivial it may seem in the beginning. Get the child treated soon to prevent serious health problems. If you aren’t sure it is thrush, get a pediatrician’s opinion.

Have you had to deal with thrush in children? Tell us about your experiences and how you managed it in the comment section below.

References:

1. Oral thrush (oral candidiasis): Overview; NCBI
2. Candida infections of the mouth, throat, and esophagus; Candida infections of the mouth, throat, and esophagus
3. Thrush—Child; Winchester Hospital
4. Thrush; Children’s Hospital Colorado
5. Oral thrush; Raising Children Network (Australia)
6. Thrush – children and adults; NIH

 

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shreeja pillai

Postgraduate in Chemistry and content writer. She has worked as a research analyst with a leading multinational pharmaceutical company and also holds a diploma in pharmaceutical regulatory affairs. Her interest in the field of medical research has developed her passion for writing research-based articles. She is a writer for MomJunction and aims at providing informative articles based on health and wellness. Apart from writing, she takes a great interest in music and traveling. know more about her at https://www.linkedin.com/in/shreeja-pillai/
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