White Curds in Baby Poop: Causes, Symptoms And When To Worry

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White curds in baby poop are not always a cause of concern. The undigested fat globules of breast milk may be excreted along with the poop in breastfed babies or those on a milk diet. Formula-fed babies may also experience the same. Apart from poop discoloration, if your baby shows symptoms of an allergic condition or other disorders, medical attention is suggested.

Read this post to learn about the possible causes of white curds in baby poop and signs that suggest the need to see a doctor.

Causes Of White Chunks In Baby Poop

The appearance of white chunks in the poop of breastfed or formula-fed babies is fairly normal. They may be clumps of undigested milk fat or undigested excess breast milk or formula protein that curdled.

Other common reasons for white curd in baby poop are (1) (2)

  • Undigested food: If your baby has started consuming solid food, the white chunks in their poop may be undigested bits of food. It happens because babies cannot chew properly, and their digestive system is still adapting and developing as they grow and are introduced to new foods.
  • Infection/illness: Although it is uncommon for breastfed baby poop to have white chunks because of food allergy or illness, you cannot rule out this possibility. If you notice signs of irritability, fever, pale or whitish frothy stool, and uncontrollable crying, consult your doctor.

Symptoms That May Accompany White Curds In Baby Poop

Although it is normal for babies to pass stool containing milk curds, consult your pediatrician if you notice the following symptoms as well.

  • Pale poop: Pale yellow or grey poop may signify that the baby’s liver is not producing enough bile (3).
  • White poop: Greyish or white poop in babies could indicate a blocked liver or biliary atresia. Though these conditions are rare in newborns, they should not be ruled out.

Other Colors Of Baby Poop

The color of normal baby poop varies as they grow, depending on their food, bowel movement, and gut health. However, some common colors of normal poop are as follows (4):

  • Black poop: Also known as meconium, this is the baby’s first poop after birth. Black poop contains all the substances that the baby ingested while in the womb.
  • Yellow poop: Your baby’s poop will eventually look yellowish and grainy in the first week after birth.
  • Green poop: Once your baby starts consuming solids, the color of their poop may change depending on what they eat. Green baby poop signifies a diet rich in iron or iron supplements or can be due to green leafy vegetables.
  • Brown poop: It signifies healthy digestion with no cause of worry.
  • Red poop: If your child had anything containing food colors or beetroots, red poop is normal. However, if you notice specks of blood in the poop, consult your doctor as it may be a sign of constipation.

Signs To Call A Doctor

White chunks in baby poop are not a cause for concern. However, consult your healthcare provider if the following signs accompany it (5) (6):

  • Diarrhea with blood specks in the poop
  • Gassiness and frothy poop
  • Pain in the stomach or abdomen
  • Pale yellow or white poop
  • Lactose intolerance symptoms such as wheezing, vomiting, and fussiness shortly after feeding
  • Frothy poop with mucus

Regardless of whether your baby is breastfed or formula-fed, the white chunks in their poop may be clumps of undigested milk fat, which will go away as their digestive system develops. However, if your baby shows signs of discomfort or fever accompanied by pale or whitish poop, contact your doctor for advice.

References:

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Sanjana Bhattacharjee

Sanjana did her post graduation in Applied Microbiology from Vellore Institute of Technology, India. Her interest in science and health, combined with her passion to write made her convert from a scientist to a writer. She believes her role at MomJunction combines the best of both worlds as she writes health-based content based on scientific evidence. Sanjana is trained in classical... more