Do Women Really Need A Day To Celebrate?

Do Women Really Need A Day To Celebrate

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Here we are again. It is that time of the year, where the world suddenly wakes up to the importance of a woman in their life. Not that they have been in a deep slumber through the year, because they do wake up now and then, make some noises, and then go back to sleep.

But on the International Women’s Day, the euphoria is at its peak. The forwards we receive on Whatsapp groups, the updates we see on FB profiles, and the creativity unleashed on us, are so overwhelming that we simply get carried away.

Carried away to the point that we wake up on 8th March with hopes and expectations… expectations from our husbands, children, male colleagues, the men in the society, and the male leaders of our country.

Sitting back, I just wondered if our expectations can be broadly categorized so that we can tick the ones that have been met and cross the ones that haven’t been. Here is the result:

Expectation 1 – from your husband: The day begins with the hope that the husband-dear will wake up before you do, come to you with a hot cup of coffee in one hand, roses in the other, and a smile on his face (don’t ask me how he can manage all the three at a time). Then he would say, “Hon, don’t work for today, I’ll manage it all.”

So, you wake up with a smile, and see that he is still snoring away inside his blanket! The first expectation simply vanishes in the air. (Of course, he will do wish you later, but that’s a different story).

Expectation 2 – from your kids: The kids will wake up, will somehow get to know that today is a special day for the mommy, give a kiss, and promise to be their best for this one day.

The children wake up, never know what’s the big deal about today, and go on with their routine tantrums to eat, bathe, and go to school.

Expectation 3 – at the workplace: You hope the company HR plans some meaningful activities to celebrate womanhood at work, and the bosses take it easy for a day.

No sooner you settle down in your chair than the manager comes for an update on the task that he assigned only last night!

Sounding funny so far? Not anymore. Let’s look at some unrealistic hopes we have from the society. The expectations might sound logical yet far-fetched.

Expectation 4 – from the society at large: This one day, you hope you can use the public transport system without the fear of being misbehaved or molested by some stranger in the bus, train, road, or cab.

This one day, you hope you drove the vehicle without the fear of evoking a man’s ego because you overtook him on the road.

This one day, you hope people don’t judge you by what you wear.

This one day, you hope not to worry about going home late in the night.

This one day, you just hope you can be yourself.

Expectation 5 – from the law-keepers: This year, just like the last year and the years before, we hope that we do not fear to go to a police station or do not be wary of attending court hearings to get justice. We hope for:

  • A detriment for men who think they can put their hand on any woman they like (by the way, has that absconding rape-accused UP minister been apprehended yet?).
  • Immediate justice to women who have been violated, so that they and their families are spared of agony and undue ignominy.
  • Stringent action on those greedy doctors who abort female fetuses or remove uteruses from women to make some quick money.

Expectation 6 – from the lawmakers: The government is making every possible arrangement to celebrate Women’s Day. But what exactly are we expecting from them? In fact, can we expect them to pass that women’s reservation bill in the parliament or can we hope that the women representatives (well, a majority of them) are not simply the puppets in the hands of their male relatives? Can we dare them not to save a libido-loose relative or a woman-abusing kin?

These are the expectations women have. The year they are met, we don’t really need a day to celebrate womanhood. Or maybe that is the year when we can actually celebrate womanhood.

My fellow women, what do you think?

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Bhavana Navuluri

B.Com, MBABhavana is the chief editor for MomJunction. She has 16 years of experience in content writing, editing, and management. She was a print media journalist for six years, before moving to online.As the chief editor, she guides her team in writing the most authentic content with no compromise on quality or editorial values.On the academic front, Bhavana is a graduate in Commerce, and has done her Masters in Business Administration, with proficiency in Accountancy, Financial Analysis, Business Economics, Planning and People Management.When not writing or editing, she loves to read (and re-read) English classics or spend time with her two children.
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