How Will The Belly Button of Your Baby Look Like

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Parents are always curious about what features their baby will have. Will they resonate more with the mother or father? From eyes to toes, they compare them all. But the most exciting thing is a baby’s belly button’s shape, as it’s the only thing that develops certain weeks after birth. But unfortunately, it can point to some medical conditions too. Be it an innie or outie, there are always questions about a baby’s navel.

Here in this article, you’ll get all your doubts cleared about your baby’s belly button. So let’s start with the basics of belly buttons.

What Is A Belly Button?

What Is A Belly Button

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A belly dip known as a navel is present in every person. It develops when the newborn’s umbilical cord is cut and fastened quickly after birth, hardens, and falls. The umbilicus often called the belly button can be innie or outie in newborns. The umbilicus is usually an innie, although some might have an outie.

What Will Your Baby Have: Innie Or Outie?

What Will Your Baby Have Innie Or Outie

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The umbilical cord’s remains are located in your baby’s belly button. At birth, the cord is what connects the mother to the fetus and allows nutrition, air, and water to pass through. The stump is secured after the cord has been severed. This stump often falls off within a few weeks, leaving your baby’s navel in its place.

There needs to be more understanding regarding how belly buttons develop and what factors influence their appearance. Well, the shape of the belly button doesn’t relate to either the outcome of the baby’s doctor’s cord clamping or how parents handled the cut-and-cracked stump after that. It simply depends on the healing process and nothing else.

Outie Belly Button And Its Concerns

Outie Belly Button And Its Concerns

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An outie resembles a little balloon. It blows out whenever the baby cries, giggles, coughs, or defecates. This is a result of the abdominal cavity’s increased pressure. Whenever the baby is relaxed, it gets smaller.

Outie typically results from two factors: an umbilical hernia and sometimes granulation tissue that forms at the umbilicus can cause additional loose skin in the area, a common cause of an out-of-place belly button (1).

An umbilical granuloma typically appears as a little bump but rarely causes your baby any pain or discomfort. However, consult your doctor and watch for changes if you have an umbilical granuloma. Additionally, an umbilical stump infection may encourage the development of too much scar tissue, leading to an exposed belly button.

An outie cannot turn into an innie, but it can go in once the abdominal muscles strengthen and the opening closes on its own. Typically, the hole closes in approximately 12 to 18 months, but if it is larger, it may take longer. The doctor can determine the size of the hole and if it will heal and seal within a few months. By the first year, minor umbilical hernias are cured.

Taking Care Of The Belly Button Region

Taking Care Of The Belly Button Region

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The belly button on your newborn must be dry and clean of any infections. Following are some tips for maintaining the belly button region:

  • Use a cotton swab to wipe the cord’s bottom when you switch your baby’s diaper.
  • Avoid covering the region with the diaper. Down-fold the diaper.
  • The baby’s urine and inadequate air circulation could cause infection if the diaper covers the cord.
  • Never attempt to pull the cord out firmly. Allow it to fall off naturally.
  • Maintain a dry base since a dryer cord will fall faster than a damp one.
  • Clean the area with gentle soap. Obtain a proper soap recommendation from your doctor.
  • Pediatricians once advised washing the area with alcohol. However, the technique is no longer recommended.
  • To prevent soaking the cord in the early days, start by giving your baby a sponge bath.

When Do The Stump Fall

When Do The Stump Fall

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Typically, the stump disappears within the first two weeks following your baby’s birth. The stump appears yellow and moist for the first few days. Then, it turns brown or black as it dries out and eventually shrinks. Although it’s a normal part of growing up, this step occasionally worries out new parents. You might see a tiny smear of blood or mucus when the stump comes off, which is nearly often okay. However, the region might need another few days to dry up properly.

When To Consult A Doctor

Keep an eye out for these infection warning symptoms and contact your doctor right away:

  • The region has a foul odor.
  • There is a yellow, gooey discharge.
  • Swelling, sensitivity, or rosiness of the skin nearby
  • High fever
  • Fatigue or prolonged sleepiness
  • Not interested in eating or eating very little.

One cannot determine how the baby’s belly will look, nor can it alter. But taking proper care of it and precautions will ensure that the baby doesn’t develop any medical conditions from it. Hopefully, your baby will develop a healthy belly button. Nothing will make your babies look less cute, whether it’s an innie or an outie.

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Dushyant Tripathi

Dushyant has a keen interest in writing about parenting and women's healthcare. He believes that knowledge about childcare and children's health should be available to every parent to enhance their overall quality of life. When he is not writing for MomJunction, you can spot him playing the ukulele, singing, and doodling.